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Barrier gates at Sörnäinen Metro station remain open most of the time

Gates used occasionally for ticket inspections


Barrier gates at Sörnäinen Metro station remain open most of the time
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Passengers on the Helsinki Metro using the Sörnäinen station have been wondering if the security gates that have been installed at the main entrance will remain unused.
      "There are no plans to close the gates permanently. Nevertheless, they are not there for nothing; they are used as technical tools to help in the inspection of tickets", says Rain Mutka of Helsinki City Transport (HKL).
      According to Mutka, the gates, which were acquired from Germany, cost EUR 50,000.
      Sanna Hirvi, head of ticket inspection operations at HKL, says that the gates are used only when there are spot checks for tickets.
     
HKL is testing the system at Sörnäinen station to see if the gates would work at other stations as well. Sanna Hirvi says that there are differing opinions among ticket inspectors as to their effectiveness: some say that the barriers make their work easier, while others say that inspecting tickets is just as easy without the gates.
      The occasional ticket inspections at the gate are seen as a way to prevent fare dodging, but not to catch and punish those without tickets. Ticketless passengers at the upper level are instructed to pay their fare, and the inspectors will even sell single tickets, if necessary.
      At other times, there is no routine control of tickets, but those caught without a valid ticket in the ticket inspections held at random on the platform level or on the trains, trams, and buses, are slapped with a penalty fare of EUR 60.
     
HKL, the Helsinki Metropolitan Area Council (YTV), and the Finnish Rail Administration implemented a project against fare dodging last autumn. Intensified ticket inspections found very few fare dodgers in buses. However, on trams, local trains, and the Metro, there was hardly ever a section without someone trying to get a free ride.
      Rain Mutka calculates that Helsinki loses about EUR 6 million in potential ticket revenue each year to fare dodgers.


Links:
  Helsinki City Transport

Helsingin Sanomat


  7.3.2005 - TODAY
 Barrier gates at Sörnäinen Metro station remain open most of the time

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